Picture Frames Guild

demand quality framing

INDUSTRY STANDARDS SUMMARY

Industry Standards, define appropriate levels of framing techniques and materials. These notes have been written to assist framers and the public to understand their application. Please also read the PFG Industry Standards brochure and FACTS publication “International Standard Guide”.

THESE GUIDELINES ARE DELIBERATELY WRITTEN AS SOFT RATHER THAN HARD STANDARDS TO ALLOW FOR FUTURE IMPROVEMENTS IN MATERIALS AND/OR KNOWLEDGE AND VARIATIONS IN EQUIPMENT. ACCORDINGLY THIS DOCUMENT MAY CHANGE FROM TIME TO TIME WITHOUT NOTICE.

 Industry Standards Detailed Explanation

Members must assess any item as to it’s condition and inform the customer about any need for treatment and which category should be applied.

Where artwork has been, or is to be, bonded to an inert support, as required in some conservation procedures and many photographic processes, that support is to be considered part of the artwork for framing purposes.

Mats for photos must have the appropriate ph level, medals will require treatment to prevent oxidisation.

Many objects may need special attention paid to the material they are made from and the way those materials may react with the proposed framing materials.

It is the framer’s obligation to be aware of the following issues:

What is the item to be framed?
What condition is it in?
Does it require treatment?
What Industry Standard category is best suited?
What materials & techniques are best suited for the category selected?

Introduction

This Standard is intended to cover the framing of items typically on, but not restricted to, paper. The framing of textiles, works on canvas, cibachrome photographs or similar, and objects, falls outside the scope of this Standard and must be considered differently. (Standards are being developed to cover the framing requirements for these items.)

The procedures and/or processes contained in the following Standard do not guarantee that any level of protection specified hereunder will be reached. There are many factors, in addition to framing, that will affect the longer-term outcome, the least of which is the condition of the artwork prior to framing.

Not withstanding the need to fully consult with the customer, framers should recognise when an item may require special treatment prior to framing and seek appropriate advice from suitably qualified professionals prior to framing.Framers should remember that they have a responsibility to advise their customers of the appropriate level of framing and of the display and environmental conditions that may have an affect on the art.


Category 1Minimum

This category provides a minimum framing standard for products aimed at the low cost or temporary display market. This category is suited to items of no commercial or sentimental value such as posters and open edition prints, or ready made frames into which a customer may place their own items. Read more

Category 2 Decorator

This category provides a superior product to Category 1. Whilst cost is still a consideration, more emphasis is placed on improving the appearance of the finished product. This category is suited to items of no commercial or sentimental value such as posters, open edition prints and photographs. Read more

Category 3Quality

This category provides a level of protection against environmental pollutants and the effects of the degradation of framing products for a period of about 5 years in normal conditions. The category is suited to items of low to moderate commercial and/or sentimental value such as posters, open edition prints, photographs and some artwork. Read more

Category 4Conservation

This category provides a level of protection against environmental pollutants and the effects of the degradation of framing products for a period of about 20 years in normal conditions. The category is suited to items such as collectable works of art, limited edition prints, and items of historic and/or sentimental value. At this level all processes relating to the art must be fully reversible. Ideally a Guild framer or conservator should examine frames every five years. It is the responsibility of the framer to recognize when artwork may require special treatment from specialists such as art conservators and make appropriate recommendations to the customer. Read more

 

Category 5Museum

This category provides a level of protection against environmental pollutants and the effects of the degradation of framing products for a period of about 35 years in normal conditions. The category is suited to museum-quality works and artwork requiring preservation. This includes artwork of high monitory value and artwork of actual or potential historical value. At this level all processes relating to the art must be fully reversible. Ideally a Guild framer or conservator should examine frames every five years. It is the responsibility of the framer to recognize when artwork may require special treatment from specialists such as art conservators and to recommend to the customer appropriately. Read more